Stamatina Gregory

Associate Dean, School of Art

Stamatina Gregory is a curator and art historian. A doctoral candidate at The Graduate Center at the City University of New York, she writes on contemporary landscape photography, militarism, activism, and the media. She has taught art history, critical theory, and writing at Hunter and Baruch Colleges, the University of Pennsylvania, and at the State University of New York, Purchase College, where she was visiting professor in 2011-2012.

In 2005-2006 she participated in the Whitney Independent Study Program, and from 2007-2009 she was the Whitney Lauder Curatorial Fellow at the Institute of Contemporary Art at the University of Pennsylvania, where she organized several exhibitions including “Carlos Motta: The Good Life,” and “Tavares Strachan: Orthostatic Tolerance.” She has curated group exhibitions and public programs at venues including FLAG Art Foundation, New York; The Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art, Eugene; Tyler School of Art, Philadelphia; The Armory Show, New York, and the Museum of Modern Art, New York. Her recent retrospective of the work of New York photographer and activist Brian Weil (1954-1996) was recently on view at the ICA in Philadelphia: the forthcoming catalog is published by Semiotext(e). She was Deputy Curator of the inaugural pavilion of The Bahamas at the 55th Venice Biennale (2013). 

  • Founded by inventor, industrialist and philanthropist Peter Cooper in 1859, The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art offers education in art, architecture and engineering, as well as courses in the humanities and social sciences.

  • “My feelings, my desires, my hopes, embrace humanity throughout the world,” Peter Cooper proclaimed in a speech in 1853. He looked forward to a time when, “knowledge shall cover the earth as waters cover the great deep.”

  • From its beginnings, Cooper Union was a unique institution, dedicated to founder Peter Cooper's proposition that education is the key not only to personal prosperity but to civic virtue and harmony.

  • Peter Cooper wanted his graduates to acquire the technical mastery and entrepreneurial skills, enrich their intellects and spark their creativity, and develop a sense of social justice that would translate into action.