Spring 2014 Seminar Series: Juan-Andres Leon

Friday, February 28, 2014, 3:00pm - 5:00pm

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THE IRWIN S. CHANIN SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE OF THE COOPER UNION

Spring 2014 Seminar Series Presents


"The Topography of Chemical Industrial Complexes"

Lecture by Luis-Andres Leon, Postdoctoral Fellow, Beckman Center for the History of Chemistry, Chemical Heritage Foundation.

Juan Andres is the 2013–2014 Gordon Cain Postdoctoral Fellow in the History of Technology, Policy, and Entrepreneurship at the Chemical Heritage Foundation (CHF). During his stay at CHF he starting a new research project that analyzes the incursion of mathematical models and computer simulations in postwar industrial and academic chemistry in the United States.

His Ph.D. dissertation in the history of science, “Citizens of the Chemical Complex” (Harvard University, 2013), explored the persona of the chemical industrialist in Imperial and Weimar Germany, showing how scientific identity shaped the German business landscape and the practice of science philanthropy, which included political support and significant participation in research beyond chemistry in such areas as applied mathematics, physics, and astronomy.

 
Located in Room 714F
 
This lecture is part of the
Advanced Topics Seminar
Instructor Lydia Xynogala
 
 
OPEN ONLY TO CURRENT COOPER UNION STUDENTS/FACULTY/STAFF
 
 

 

  • Founded by inventor, industrialist and philanthropist Peter Cooper in 1859, The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art offers education in art, architecture and engineering, as well as courses in the humanities and social sciences.

  • “My feelings, my desires, my hopes, embrace humanity throughout the world,” Peter Cooper proclaimed in a speech in 1853. He looked forward to a time when, “knowledge shall cover the earth as waters cover the great deep.”

  • From its beginnings, Cooper Union was a unique institution, dedicated to founder Peter Cooper's proposition that education is the key not only to personal prosperity but to civic virtue and harmony.

  • Peter Cooper wanted his graduates to acquire the technical mastery and entrepreneurial skills, enrich their intellects and spark their creativity, and develop a sense of social justice that would translate into action.